Foundations in perinatal mental health

Overview

Our perinatal e-learning courses aspire to foster empathy and understanding among care professionals. One of our main goals is to increase empathy and understanding among care practitioners.

Learning outcomes

Module 1: Perinatal mental health

  • Explain why perinatal mental health is a critical issue for pēpi, parents, and whānau and how it can impact on present and future generations
  • Recognise the significance of addressing perinatal distress and the importance of service delivery in preventing and attending to perinatal distress with urgency
  • Describe the impact of perinatal mental health conditions on maternal mortality rates in Aotearoa New Zealand

Module 2: Cultural competency

  • Reflect on one’s cultural safety practice and the impact of bias on whānau
  • Describe indigenous perinatal practices and the impact of colonisation on these
  • Identify risk factors for perinatal distress from a cultural lens
  • Identify obligations to Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to patient-staff relationships
  • Identify and incorporate cultural considerations when working with whānau during the perinatal period
  • Apply enquiring skills to asking about cultural practices observed during the whānau perinatal journey

Module 3: Whānau centred approaches

  • Describe a whānau-centred approach
  • Identify the importance of whānau, community, and cultural factors in perinatal mental health and wellbeing
  • Recognise the significance of a whānau-centred approach to perinatal mental healthcare
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage with the whānau respectfully, empathetically, and culturally responsively
  • Explain different models of care that support a whānau-centred approach

Module 4: Pregnancy

  • Define and explain the importance of prenatal attachment in promoting the health and well-being of both parent and prenatal pēpi.
  • Identify factors contributing to the unique pregnancy experience, including biological, psychological, and social factors.
  • Describe the importance of social support, information, and problem-solving for families during the pregnancy journey.
  • Recognise the importance of addressing bias, assumptions, knowledge limitations, and capacities of care providers in responding to the pregnant whānau.

Module 5: Parenting

  • Describe the key elements of the parenting-as-a-journey approach, include the perspective that parenting is an ongoing process of reflection and growth
  • Explain how one's upbringing and past experiences can influence their parenting style and approach
  • Recognise the importance of reflecting on and planning for the parenting journey, include how you want to parent and what you want for your tamariki
  • Analyse different types of parenting networks and support systems available, include kohanga, direct village, and hapu/iwi
  • Identify supportive resources and tools that promote flourishing and aroha in parenting, including cultural and community-based practices

Module 6: Other vulnerable populations

  • Apply cultural competency skills to provide appropriate care for vulnerable perinatal populations
  • Implement inclusive care practices for rainbow (LGBTQIA+) whānau
  • Develop inclusive care plans for refugee and migrant populations, while respecting their cultural backgrounds and language barriers
  • Identify potential barriers to care and empower vulnerable perinatal populations to participate in their healthcare decision-makings

Queries

If you have any concerns or issues please email coordinator@wharaurau.org.nz

Note: If you have already registered for this course then log back in here.

Overview

Our perinatal e-learning courses aspire to foster empathy and understanding among care professionals. One of our main goals is to increase empathy and understanding among care practitioners.

Learning outcomes

Module 1: Perinatal mental health

  • Explain why perinatal mental health is a critical issue for pēpi, parents, and whānau and how it can impact on present and future generations
  • Recognise the significance of addressing perinatal distress and the importance of service delivery in preventing and attending to perinatal distress with urgency
  • Describe the impact of perinatal mental health conditions on maternal mortality rates in Aotearoa New Zealand

Module 2: Cultural competency

  • Reflect on one’s cultural safety practice and the impact of bias on whānau
  • Describe indigenous perinatal practices and the impact of colonisation on these
  • Identify risk factors for perinatal distress from a cultural lens
  • Identify obligations to Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to patient-staff relationships
  • Identify and incorporate cultural considerations when working with whānau during the perinatal period
  • Apply enquiring skills to asking about cultural practices observed during the whānau perinatal journey

Module 3: Whānau centred approaches

  • Describe a whānau-centred approach
  • Identify the importance of whānau, community, and cultural factors in perinatal mental health and wellbeing
  • Recognise the significance of a whānau-centred approach to perinatal mental healthcare
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage with the whānau respectfully, empathetically, and culturally responsively
  • Explain different models of care that support a whānau-centred approach

Module 4: Pregnancy

  • Define and explain the importance of prenatal attachment in promoting the health and well-being of both parent and prenatal pēpi.
  • Identify factors contributing to the unique pregnancy experience, including biological, psychological, and social factors.
  • Describe the importance of social support, information, and problem-solving for families during the pregnancy journey.
  • Recognise the importance of addressing bias, assumptions, knowledge limitations, and capacities of care providers in responding to the pregnant whānau.

Module 5: Parenting

  • Describe the key elements of the parenting-as-a-journey approach, include the perspective that parenting is an ongoing process of reflection and growth
  • Explain how one's upbringing and past experiences can influence their parenting style and approach
  • Recognise the importance of reflecting on and planning for the parenting journey, include how you want to parent and what you want for your tamariki
  • Analyse different types of parenting networks and support systems available, include kohanga, direct village, and hapu/iwi
  • Identify supportive resources and tools that promote flourishing and aroha in parenting, including cultural and community-based practices

Module 6: Other vulnerable populations

  • Apply cultural competency skills to provide appropriate care for vulnerable perinatal populations
  • Implement inclusive care practices for rainbow (LGBTQIA+) whānau
  • Develop inclusive care plans for refugee and migrant populations, while respecting their cultural backgrounds and language barriers
  • Identify potential barriers to care and empower vulnerable perinatal populations to participate in their healthcare decision-makings

Queries

If you have any concerns or issues please email coordinator@wharaurau.org.nz

Note: If you have already registered for this course then log back in here.

Overview

Our perinatal e-learning courses aspire to foster empathy and understanding among care professionals. One of our main goals is to increase empathy and understanding among care practitioners.

Learning outcomes

Module 1: Perinatal mental health

  • Explain why perinatal mental health is a critical issue for pēpi, parents, and whānau and how it can impact on present and future generations
  • Recognise the significance of addressing perinatal distress and the importance of service delivery in preventing and attending to perinatal distress with urgency
  • Describe the impact of perinatal mental health conditions on maternal mortality rates in Aotearoa New Zealand

Module 2: Cultural competency

  • Reflect on one’s cultural safety practice and the impact of bias on whānau
  • Describe indigenous perinatal practices and the impact of colonisation on these
  • Identify risk factors for perinatal distress from a cultural lens
  • Identify obligations to Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to patient-staff relationships
  • Identify and incorporate cultural considerations when working with whānau during the perinatal period
  • Apply enquiring skills to asking about cultural practices observed during the whānau perinatal journey

Module 3: Whānau centred approaches

  • Describe a whānau-centred approach
  • Identify the importance of whānau, community, and cultural factors in perinatal mental health and wellbeing
  • Recognise the significance of a whānau-centred approach to perinatal mental healthcare
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage with the whānau respectfully, empathetically, and culturally responsively
  • Explain different models of care that support a whānau-centred approach

Module 4: Pregnancy

  • Define and explain the importance of prenatal attachment in promoting the health and well-being of both parent and prenatal pēpi.
  • Identify factors contributing to the unique pregnancy experience, including biological, psychological, and social factors.
  • Describe the importance of social support, information, and problem-solving for families during the pregnancy journey.
  • Recognise the importance of addressing bias, assumptions, knowledge limitations, and capacities of care providers in responding to the pregnant whānau.

Module 5: Parenting

  • Describe the key elements of the parenting-as-a-journey approach, include the perspective that parenting is an ongoing process of reflection and growth
  • Explain how one's upbringing and past experiences can influence their parenting style and approach
  • Recognise the importance of reflecting on and planning for the parenting journey, include how you want to parent and what you want for your tamariki
  • Analyse different types of parenting networks and support systems available, include kohanga, direct village, and hapu/iwi
  • Identify supportive resources and tools that promote flourishing and aroha in parenting, including cultural and community-based practices

Module 6: Other vulnerable populations

  • Apply cultural competency skills to provide appropriate care for vulnerable perinatal populations
  • Implement inclusive care practices for rainbow (LGBTQIA+) whānau
  • Develop inclusive care plans for refugee and migrant populations, while respecting their cultural backgrounds and language barriers
  • Identify potential barriers to care and empower vulnerable perinatal populations to participate in their healthcare decision-makings

Queries

If you have any concerns or issues please email coordinator@wharaurau.org.nz

Note: If you have already registered for this course then log back in here.

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Overview

Our perinatal e-learning courses aspire to foster empathy and understanding among care professionals. One of our main goals is to increase empathy and understanding among care practitioners.

Learning outcomes

Module 1: Perinatal mental health

  • Explain why perinatal mental health is a critical issue for pēpi, parents, and whānau and how it can impact on present and future generations
  • Recognise the significance of addressing perinatal distress and the importance of service delivery in preventing and attending to perinatal distress with urgency
  • Describe the impact of perinatal mental health conditions on maternal mortality rates in Aotearoa New Zealand

Module 2: Cultural competency

  • Reflect on one’s cultural safety practice and the impact of bias on whānau
  • Describe indigenous perinatal practices and the impact of colonisation on these
  • Identify risk factors for perinatal distress from a cultural lens
  • Identify obligations to Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to patient-staff relationships
  • Identify and incorporate cultural considerations when working with whānau during the perinatal period
  • Apply enquiring skills to asking about cultural practices observed during the whānau perinatal journey

Module 3: Whānau centred approaches

  • Describe a whānau-centred approach
  • Identify the importance of whānau, community, and cultural factors in perinatal mental health and wellbeing
  • Recognise the significance of a whānau-centred approach to perinatal mental healthcare
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage with the whānau respectfully, empathetically, and culturally responsively
  • Explain different models of care that support a whānau-centred approach

Module 4: Pregnancy

  • Define and explain the importance of prenatal attachment in promoting the health and well-being of both parent and prenatal pēpi.
  • Identify factors contributing to the unique pregnancy experience, including biological, psychological, and social factors.
  • Describe the importance of social support, information, and problem-solving for families during the pregnancy journey.
  • Recognise the importance of addressing bias, assumptions, knowledge limitations, and capacities of care providers in responding to the pregnant whānau.

Module 5: Parenting

  • Describe the key elements of the parenting-as-a-journey approach, include the perspective that parenting is an ongoing process of reflection and growth
  • Explain how one's upbringing and past experiences can influence their parenting style and approach
  • Recognise the importance of reflecting on and planning for the parenting journey, include how you want to parent and what you want for your tamariki
  • Analyse different types of parenting networks and support systems available, include kohanga, direct village, and hapu/iwi
  • Identify supportive resources and tools that promote flourishing and aroha in parenting, including cultural and community-based practices

Module 6: Other vulnerable populations

  • Apply cultural competency skills to provide appropriate care for vulnerable perinatal populations
  • Implement inclusive care practices for rainbow (LGBTQIA+) whānau
  • Develop inclusive care plans for refugee and migrant populations, while respecting their cultural backgrounds and language barriers
  • Identify potential barriers to care and empower vulnerable perinatal populations to participate in their healthcare decision-makings

Queries

If you have any concerns or issues please email coordinator@wharaurau.org.nz

Note: If you have already registered for this course then log back in here.

Overview

Our perinatal e-learning courses aspire to foster empathy and understanding among care professionals. One of our main goals is to increase empathy and understanding among care practitioners.

Learning outcomes

Module 1: Perinatal mental health

  • Explain why perinatal mental health is a critical issue for pēpi, parents, and whānau and how it can impact on present and future generations
  • Recognise the significance of addressing perinatal distress and the importance of service delivery in preventing and attending to perinatal distress with urgency
  • Describe the impact of perinatal mental health conditions on maternal mortality rates in Aotearoa New Zealand

Module 2: Cultural competency

  • Reflect on one’s cultural safety practice and the impact of bias on whānau
  • Describe indigenous perinatal practices and the impact of colonisation on these
  • Identify risk factors for perinatal distress from a cultural lens
  • Identify obligations to Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to patient-staff relationships
  • Identify and incorporate cultural considerations when working with whānau during the perinatal period
  • Apply enquiring skills to asking about cultural practices observed during the whānau perinatal journey

Module 3: Whānau centred approaches

  • Describe a whānau-centred approach
  • Identify the importance of whānau, community, and cultural factors in perinatal mental health and wellbeing
  • Recognise the significance of a whānau-centred approach to perinatal mental healthcare
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage with the whānau respectfully, empathetically, and culturally responsively
  • Explain different models of care that support a whānau-centred approach

Module 4: Pregnancy

  • Define and explain the importance of prenatal attachment in promoting the health and well-being of both parent and prenatal pēpi.
  • Identify factors contributing to the unique pregnancy experience, including biological, psychological, and social factors.
  • Describe the importance of social support, information, and problem-solving for families during the pregnancy journey.
  • Recognise the importance of addressing bias, assumptions, knowledge limitations, and capacities of care providers in responding to the pregnant whānau.

Module 5: Parenting

  • Describe the key elements of the parenting-as-a-journey approach, include the perspective that parenting is an ongoing process of reflection and growth
  • Explain how one's upbringing and past experiences can influence their parenting style and approach
  • Recognise the importance of reflecting on and planning for the parenting journey, include how you want to parent and what you want for your tamariki
  • Analyse different types of parenting networks and support systems available, include kohanga, direct village, and hapu/iwi
  • Identify supportive resources and tools that promote flourishing and aroha in parenting, including cultural and community-based practices

Module 6: Other vulnerable populations

  • Apply cultural competency skills to provide appropriate care for vulnerable perinatal populations
  • Implement inclusive care practices for rainbow (LGBTQIA+) whānau
  • Develop inclusive care plans for refugee and migrant populations, while respecting their cultural backgrounds and language barriers
  • Identify potential barriers to care and empower vulnerable perinatal populations to participate in their healthcare decision-makings

Queries

If you have any concerns or issues please email coordinator@wharaurau.org.nz

Note: If you have already registered for this course then log back in here.

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Frequently asked questions

The event or training is face-to-face however the location has yet to be confirmed.

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We do record some of our trainings/events and if this is the case we will make this clear at the start of the session. If it has been recorded, and you wish to receive a copy please email coordinator@whāraurau.org.nz

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We’ll let you know as soon as we can and within time for you to make travel arrangements.

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There may be times where a manager’s consent is required to attend a training, and also if you don’t turn up, we may message them to find out if you’re okay.

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Are training/events/online courses only for those people working in specific services/organisations?

The majority of our training/events/online courses are open to anyone working with rangatahi | young people who are experiencing mental health or addiction issues. If there is a restriction on who can attend, this will be made clear on the information we provide.

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Frequently asked questions

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Please email coordinator@wharaurau.org.nz and we’ll help get you back in.

Will I receive a completion certificate?

Yes, at the end of each online course you will receive a completion certificate.

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Email us on coordinator@wharaurau.org.nz outlining the problem and we’ll get back to you.

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That is fine – our online courses are meant to be self-paced, and you can complete it when you have the time.

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